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Ep. 29 - Leveraging YouTube to Enhance Your SEO Strategy with John Locke

John Locke is an SEO consultant who has recently launched a YouTube channel, allowing his business to grow in really exciting ways. He has been learning about SEO online since 2012, and doing online marketing and web design full time for the past two and a half years, mostly helping manufacturing, industrial, or other blue collar companies get traffic with SEO.

While he used to get all of his leads from blog content, over the last few months, when he started posting daily YouTube videos, he’s found customers discovering him directly through YouTube. In this episode, we talk about how creating content on YouTube can boost traffic to your website and help you find people who will resonate with your brand.

In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • [3:10] What led John to YouTube
  • [4:30] The thought process behind making daily videos
  • [5:45] Is it worth editing your videos?
  • [8:10] How YouTube marketing can impact business
  • [15:45] How store owners can create content around their business
  • [20:30] Hashtag strategies for YouTube
  • [25:40] Performing an SEO audit

Resources:

If you’re enjoying the show, we’d love it if you left Honest eCommerce a review on Apple Podcasts. It makes a huge impact on the success of the podcast, and we love reading every one of your reviews!

 

Transcript:

 

 

John Locke

The people who are going to vibe with you are going to find you. And you just have to put content out there for that to happen. So as long as you're doing that, you're going to be fine.

 

Annette Grant

Welcome to Honest eCommerce where we are dedicated to cutting through the BS and finding actionable advice for online store owners.

 

Chase Clymer

I'm your host, Chase Clymer

 

Annette Grant

And I'm your host, Annette Grant.

 

Chase Clymer

And we believe running an online business does not have to be complicated or a guessing game.

 

Annette Grant

If you're struggling to scale your sales, Electric Eye is here to help. To apply to work with us. visit electriceye.io/connect to learn more.

 

Chase Clymer

And let's get on with the show.

 

On today's episode of Honest eCommerce, we welcome John Locke. John Locke is an SEO consultant who's recently launched a YouTube channel that's helped his business grow in awesome ways.

 

Annette, welcome back to Honest eCommerce. You missed the last episode last week.

 

And now you were super frustrated and I'm sure she's gonna listen to the episode before everyone else gets to listen to the episode because she's the biggest nerd out of all of us.

 

Annette Grant

(laughs)

 

Chase Clymer

But today, we're also welcoming John Locke. John Locke is an SEO consultant that I'm actually a fan of, and he had a really, really unique thing he's been doing lately, and we're going to talk about that in a bit.

 

But first, let's talk about your SEO background, John. Welcome to the show.

 

Annette Grant

Hi, John.

 

John Locke

Hello. Hello, Annette. Hello, Chase. Yeah, so I'll start with my SEO background. 10 years ago, I didn't know a lick of HTML. I didn't know anything about online marketing. I basically learned from online materials, how to do it, since 2012.

 

I've been doing online marketing and web design as my full-time gig. For the past 2 and a half years, I've been working focusing mostly on SEO because... I mean, honestly, that's what people want anyway. They want traffic to their sites.

 

They don't just want a pretty website, they want traffic to it. So mostly I'm helping manufacturing and industrial companies, or other blue-collar companies with SEO right now.

 

Chase Clymer

That's awesome. And I think that that is probably one of the number one questions I have whenever a new lead comes into our agency.

 

I'm like, "Cool. We're gonna make this amazing, beautiful website. How are we going to get people there?" And they're almost (always) dumbfounded. But I ask that question on purpose. Without traffic, you just got a beautiful store.

 

John Locke

Right. Yeah, absolutely.

 

Chase Clymer

Cool. So let's... The pièce de résistance. No. That's not how you say that.

 

Annette Grant

(laughs)

 

Chase Clymer

But anyway, there's the main reason I reached out to John and it comes back to quite often. We're talking about producing content on here and finding things that you can speak about, that your audience will engage with.

 

And I've been following John now for 6 months or so on Twitter. I've been loving his SEO content that he puts out and now he just told me today that he's been doing it daily.

 

So John, as just a real-life example, what led you to YouTube? What led you to solving/answering these questions on your channel? And how has that been impacting your business from a real-life example?

 

John Locke

Right. So, great question. About 4 or 5 years ago, I started doing YouTube videos and I slacked off on it for a long time. And about a year ago, --maybe a little bit more than a year ago-- I started doing videos again. And since that time, --I think it was about March 2018-- I started doing them a couple of times a week.

 

I think the last 3 or maybe 4 months or so, I decided to just start doing them daily. The interesting thing is before I would get all of my leads from blog content, it would just be things that would show up in the search results.

 

But over the last couple of months, I've noticed something very interesting where I'm getting leads directly from my YouTube channel. And people are saying, specifically, "I found you on YouTube."

 

So, the daily thing, maybe it's just answering questions. People are finding answers to those specific questions and they're becoming qualified leads.

 

Annette Grant

So I'm going to be honest, I have not watched one of your (laughs) YouTube videos.

 

John Locke

Yeah. No big deal.

 

Annette Grant

So give our listeners an idea of the length of your video, the content of the video, and are you producing all of this yourself? Walk us through a day in the life of this YouTube sensation you are now.

 

John Locke

Oh, okay. Yeah. Definitely. So it's pretty basic. What I'll do is I'll... Each day, I'll (be) looking (at) SEO forums. Maybe it'll be something on SEO Twitter, maybe it'll be something on one of the Reddit SEO Channels.

 

Sometimes it's a question from one of the many Facebook groups that I'm part of or a Slack channel, but I will take real questions that people are asking and I will answer it in a video. And how I do it generally, is pretty low-budget.

 

I just have an iPhone and I have a lavalier mic that plugs into that and I'll just answer those out on the property.

 

And the videos are usually somewhere between maybe 4 minutes and 11 minutes. Some of them, a couple of them go a little bit longer than that, but most of them are in you know that 4 to 11-minute range.

 

Annette Grant

Okay. And then are you uploading them immediately following or do you do some editing?

 

John Locke

No, I... That's the thing. I was doing editing. Like I said, a year ago when I was trying to do you know two or three videos a week. would edit it. I'd take out all the 'umm' and 'uhh' and all this stammering like that.

 

Annette Grant

Mm-hm.

 

John Locke

And what I found is, it's just really time-consuming. And it was just quicker for me to just upload it immediately. So that's what I do. I just have the YouTube app on my phone.

 

And so I'll record it and just upload it immediately. That's usually the first thing I do after I get a cup of coffee. Just go out, and make a video, and upload it.

 

Annette Grant

Boom. I love that. Because I've been wanting to do that.

 

Chase Clymer

Straight from the camera.

 

Annette Grant

I've been wanting to do YouTube stuff for so long. (But) I don't want to edit it and this and that. So you just answered all those questions. Hopefully for me...

 

Chase Clymer

Well, I think it's just it's more natural when it's off the cuff. And it's like, the more polished it is, while that's a better, more polished content... If you're not selling this content or something like that, if you're just answering questions, just get it out there.

 

People, they just want to actually see you speak about the subjects that you're supposedly an expert in. So, once you start answering those questions, they start to identify you with that subject matter.

 

And it's doing exactly what it needs to do to you and having some of those weird hiccups doesn't really matter.

 

John Locke

Yeah, I found that it doesn't really matter. And one of the comments that I found is... Well, in marketing, there's a lot of slickly produced stuff and I think a lot of times people feel like people are trying to sell them stuff. And with this type of quick production, where it is just answering stuff in a natural environment, I think a lot of people find that more relatable. At least that's what people are telling me.

 

Chase Clymer

Yeah, I mean, it's not as slick. And it's that old school vlog. V-L-O-G.

 

John Locke

Mm-hmm.

 

Chase Clymer

Let's get into that. Yeah, I think that's amazing. So, obviously, you've been doing this now for 6 months. I've been on it daily for 2 to 3 months.

 

Is there any sort of numbers that you can share of how this type of marketing has impacted your business?

 

John Locke

Yeah. Definitely. So, my channel right now has about 50,000 views. One thing that I found when I went from doing 2 to 3 videos a week to doing daily is my subscriber count seems to go up, for whatever reason.

 

I don't know if it's the YouTube algorithm. I've heard people say that before. It seems to push your videos a little harder and I've definitely had more subscribers per month since then. But the most direct impact that it's had...

 

And like I said, some of these videos might have a dozen views. Some of them have a couple hundred, a few of them have, 1000 views but most of the view counts are not blow away numbers.

 

But what I found is, people that have a real need are finding them, and they're contacting me and a lot of that is turning into a business that becomes clients. So it's having a definite impact.

 

Chase Clymer

That's the gold right there. You said at some of these videos have 12 views and you're still getting qualified people into your business funnel to hopefully do business with you at some point.

 

And that's kind of like the takeaway that I wanted from this whole entire episode is just to be like, you don't need to be a YouTube sensation. I don't know any YouTube sensations. I follow weird Dungeons and Dragons stuff online.

 

John Locke

(laughs)

 

Chase Clymer

So nothing that you guys would recognize. (laughs) But, it doesn't have to be these crazy numbers. Me and my business partner, Shawn have talked about this before. And he's like, "Well, what are these numbers for the podcast mean? "And I'm like, "It means people are listening. It doesn't matter how many are listening.

 

People like what we're saying." And I think that's just something that people need to... It's a vanity metric, at the end of the day. That's where I was going with that tirade. It was just like, it's just about getting your content in front of people.

 

And if it's real, and you're actually coming from a place of trying to help other people and educate them about whatever it is that your product is or your brand or whatnot, people will find that and they'll think it's authentic, and they want to don't want to do business with you. Because people like doing business with other people, at the end of the day.

 

John Locke

No, I think you said something really great there. It's just putting it out there. And I think a lot of people obsess over, looking perfect or saying things perfect on camera, or having it perfectly edited and it's true.

 

I even have clients that do YouTube videos and it's the same thing. What they tell me is their customers, they get to know them through the video. When people watch you, and they see you, it's a familiarity that they have with you. And they kind of get a vibe from you, whether they like you or not.

 

And I think that video conveys that a lot better than just the written word. Podcasts are a good way, too but when people have both the audio and the visual together, they get a sense of what you're like. And they feel familiar with you.

 

And it's the "Know, Like, and Trust." If they know you, like you, and trust you, they're going to do business with you.

 

Annette Grant

And that happens. I've read stats or been at a seminar before when they said that. For instance, your blog versus your video. When someone can see you and hear you, they'll know right away if they're jiving with you or not.

 

So you can be blogging or let's say Instagram posts for months and months and months and then someone hears you talk once and they're like, "Oh man, I can't stand that girl" or "I can't stand that guy" or it's just something that makes you like them and trust them immediately.

 

So a lot of times you can --with video and audio-- catapult that a lot faster than just doing a blog post or photos via Instagram?

 

John Locke

Definitely. I mean, I think all those channels are good, too. I think any marketing channel that you can commit to is a good one. But I mean, video, definitely.

 

It doesn't require anything but people pushing the play button on the video. They don't have to read, they don't have to think, they can just watch.

 

Chase Clymer

Yeah, I can't agree any more than that. And then like you said, just get started with it. I remember when we were playing around with the idea of starting the podcast, Annette was pushing me very, very hard.

 

And I want to give a big shout out to Crate Media in the building here. They do our podcast for us. He was actually just here this morning. It's why it's top of mind. But without Annette and him pushing me to do this, I wouldn't have done it out of just being almost stubborn and ill-informed. It was so easy to get started.

 

It was awkward the first couple of times and now I just ramble into a microphone. And usually, I make a point every once in a while, but it's... Just get started with it.

 

Annette Grant

John, when you started with YouTube but did you have goals in mind about getting more leads? Or was it just like, "I want to make a bigger impact" and you thought that was the best way to go about it? What was the thought process there?

 

John Locke

If I'm really honest with myself, I think my initial goal was to just get more exposure. I think at first I was more concerned with getting my peers and my colleagues to follow and recognition like that. And that's just speaking like really honest.

 

But I think as time went on, it was more just like, "I'm going to do this and whoever shows up and whoever watches, that's the audience that I'm cultivating." And like I said, from years ago, when I did this and let it go fallow, it was the same thing.

 

If you just put stuff out there, you're going to attract a certain audience on YouTube and it takes time for it to grow and for it to cultivate, but the people who are going to vibe with you are going to find you and you just have to put content out there for that to happen.

 

So as long as you're doing that you're going to be fine.

 

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Annette Grant

Let's bring it back to all of our listeners then. So let's say... I'd say a bulk of our listeners are either store owners or developers. So talk to... Especially store owners, I know they get bogged down in just the day-to-day producing products.

 

What would your advice be on them trying to push out content around their product? Is it more of get-to-know the business and do maybe show behind-the-scenes of the business or behind-the-scenes of the product? How would you give guidance there?

 

John Locke

No, I think that's great. I definitely have clients that I'm trying to push more into video right now.

 

Annette Grant

Okay.

 

John Locke

And I look at it... I'm not going to name names, but I look at some of their competitors and that's what they're doing. And I'm like, "You need to do more of that."

 

I think it is important for people to get to know the behind-the-scenes of the business and just get to know the people behind it. Because I think knowing the people behind it, it makes it more relatable. You get to know their story and you're more invested in seeing them when you have a good brand story.

 

That makes a big difference because people see themselves in that and they think of you not like a friend but somebody that they can relate to and they want to see when. (It's) definitely good to have product tutorials.

 

So maybe like how you can use the product in different ways, or ways in which product and make your life better or easier or more fulfilled, no matter what it is, that you're using it. So, yeah. Definitely, I think a good mix of both.

 

Annette Grant

I have some other questions that I'm not gonna be able to articulate properly, so I'm hoping you're gonna help me with this.

 

John Locke

Okay.

 

Annette Grant

My thought process, as I've learned about YouTube... Is YouTube the second or third largest search engine? It's a second? Chase is... So it's Google, and then YouTube, correct?

 

Chase Clymer

And they share data.

 

Annette Grant

Okay. And then so, talk to me about that as a store owner isn't... In SEO, isn't YouTube and video... Isn't that pushing up to the top of SEO, currently? Google's putting video at the top specifically, YouTube. And wait, is YouTube owned by Google?

 

Chase Clymer

Yes.

 

John Locke

Yeah.

 

Annette Grant

Oh. Okay. (laughs)

 

John Locke

YouTube is owned by Google. So yeah, they're gonna push their own property.

 

Annette Grant

Right. So I think like before, YouTube videos weren't at the top of the search engine optimization. Correct? Isn't that newer...

 

Chase Clymer

They've had it for a while.

 

Annette Grant

Okay.

 

Chase Clymer

Quite a while...

 

Annette Grant

Okay.

 

Chase Clymer

But to articulate... I think... And I'm sure John is going to help me out here when I start talking out my butt. But I do know that video on a page, especially product pages, increases time on page...

 

John Locke

Mm-hmm. Yep.

 

Chase Clymer

...which gives Google good signals.

 

Annette Grant

Okay.

 

Chase Clymer

So not even just having that YouTube video, because that YouTube video being on YouTube is going to send traffic back to your website. --hopefully, you're linking back to your product page about that product-- but vice versa, it's going to send Google signals about that page containing content that people liked because they're on the page longer and that's going to make Google happy.

 

Annette Grant

Okay, can I... I have a product that I do have YouTube videos specifically around. Can I link those in my Shopify store? The YouTube video? Or does it have to be within Shopify? Or let's say Squarespace, any of those?

 

Chase Clymer

No, you can just go and drop it right in?

 

Annette Grant

Mm. Interesting. Okay.

 

Chase Clymer

Yeah.

 

John Locke

So that's something that I always do, too. Whenever I make a video, I put a link to a page on my site in there. So if there's... Let's say that if I have a video and I have an accompanying blog post, I will put the URL of that in the YouTube video.

 

Now those are nofollow links. But what happens sometimes, is scraper sites will pick those up and they will basically copy that content and put it out there. I know Google disregards those for the most part, but it's just like a little bit extra out there. Just one more link out there, even if it's not worth a whole lot.

 

But people that are watching your video if they go down to the description of the video, they can get more information by clicking that link. It's much like putting links and show notes of a podcast.

 

Annette Grant

Mm-hmm.

 

John Locke

It just gives people a way to go directly to the site. So if you're doing a video about a product, link up the product page in the description of that video.

 

Annette Grant

Do you put links every day in your daily videos? Is that part of your process?

 

John Locke

Yeah. Every video that I put out, there's a link in there. Also, another thing that I do is put hashtags in there. So, YouTube will take the first three hashtags that are in your video description and they will put them at the top.

 

Say, if you're watching a video, there's the video, then there's the title, and then right above the actual video description, there will be any hashtags that it finds in there.

 

So if you can find hashtags that have some kind of popularity, --and I always check this out, too, before I put a hashtag in there-- but if people are searching hashtags on YouTube, you can put yours in there as well. And it's just another way of adding discoverability to that.

 

Annette Grant

Did you say three? You only put three?

 

John Locke

It will only take the first three.

 

Annette Grant

Okay.

 

John Locke

So, the one thing that I do in the video descriptions... Let's say if I'm writing something like number one (#1), I won't put like the hashtag symbol (#) number one, because that will become a hashtag.

 

But YouTube will extract the first three hashtags, anything more than that it will ignore. But the first three that it finds in the video description, it will put at the top of the video.

 

Annette Grant

Okay, that's good to know.

 

Chase Clymer

Yeah. Annette's... Every time we do one of these, Annette's like, "I have something new to do."

 

Annette Grant

Yeah, no. Because now all of a sudden, you're like...Uploading through the app got a lot longer because you're making links back to your site and hashtags. So do you have a cadence just like this checklist that you follow every day?

 

John Locke

Right. So what I do... What you can do is (to) go into your YouTube settings and your Upload Defaults under Settings, I have it set up to where it's just a link to my homepage, and then two hashtags, and then here's social links. And so I can just copy-paste that into the description and then put a description above that, at the top And then add like one more hashtag.

 

Annette Grant

Boom.

 

John Locke

And that just makes it quicker.

 

Annette Grant

I did not know that. Okay, that's... The episode is over because now I have that. That's awesome. Okay. Got it. Thank you.

 

Chase Clymer

Gotcha. So John, let's bring it back to your wheelhouse though, with SEO.

 

Obviously, any sort of other advice that you have about video and how it affects SEO that we haven't touched on yet before we kind of move into the main event of just your thoughts on SEO for eCommerce.

 

John Locke

Yeah, like (what) you touched on, if you put a video on a product page, what I've noticed is that it really seems to help a lot because I think people do watch that. It's a longer time on page. Every time that I've done that for a client base, those pages do seem to boost up in the ranking.

 

It's just one more way that people can discover, whatever it is, whatever the keyword is for that product. So you have two chances, now. You have the video plus you have the actual product page. So yeah, it's definitely something... If you got time to do it, definitely do it.

 

Chase Clymer

And just a quick reminder, you guys can retarget people through Facebook and Instagram, based upon their time on page, as well as obviously watching videos on those native platforms.

 

But you can actually set it up to where you can run timers for time on page through Facebook and Instagram retargeting.

 

John Locke

Oh nice.

 

Chase Clymer

So people getting into your...

 

Annette Grant

On YouTube or on your own store?

 

Chase Clymer

So this will be... You have to be in an actual store you own. Shopify makes it pretty easy. There are some apps that do it as well. Or you can hard code it in. It's not that hard.

 

Annette Grant

Okay. So, slow down. Explain that.

 

Chase Clymer

You can create, essentially, events that trigger on your site...

 

Annette Grant

Okay.

 

Chase Clymer

...after, say 5 seconds, 10 seconds, 30 seconds.

 

Annette Grant

Mm-hmm.

 

Chase Clymer

And then you can create retargeting audiences off those.

 

Annette Grant

Mm-kay. And you'll know they're watching specific product videos?

 

Chase Clymer

I don't know about that. But if they're on a page that has a product video, one's going to assume that they're watching a video and maybe check... Maybe they aren't, but you can never know on all of the stuff.

 

Annette Grant

I want to know exactly what they're watching. Okay, but I do like that if they're out there watching... Got it.

 

Chase Clymer

Cool. So John, thank you so much for coming on today. I do know that you have some stuff here that you wanted to share with our audience.

 

First and foremost being, if you want to know more about John and what he's up to and check out his YouTube channel --which I love-- the content, by the way, isn't really geared 100% towards his niche, and correct me if I'm wrong, John.

 

John Locke

No. It definitely hits other things. Some of the questions that I see or some of the questions that I get are, around local SEO, too, or just general SEO. So it's not just manufacturing and industrial SEO. A lot of the stuff that I talk about is just questions that I get.

 

Chase Clymer

Absolutely. So one of those is probably, How Do I Do an SEO Audit? and you have a fantastic... Is this a checklist? What are we going to be looking at here?

 

John Locke

Yeah, it's like a checklist but it's the framework of how I do an actual SEO audit. And the reason why I put this out is because a lot of people... There's a lot of tools out there. Software tools. SEMrush, Ahrefs, Siteliner, all these things... MySiteAuditor...

 

A lot of people who give these out as a lead magnet, they're basically like auto-generated, just really super quick overviews of your site and people call these SEO audits. But, even if you implement the advice in these one or two-page things, it really often doesn't fix your SEO because it's usually bigger issues.

 

So, in the audits that I do for people that I sell, this is the actual framework of what I do. Because people ask this and I just figured, I'm going to just show how I do these and what I actually look for, because I know that most people will not do these because this is actually a fair bit of work.

 

So this article here is how I do these and the actual framework that I use. If you want to do that for your own site, it's a good place to start. This is everything that I do.

 

Chase Clymer

And would I need any extra special tools or anything --like you'd mentioned earlier-- to do this audit? Or can I get it all done with Google Analytics?

 

John Locke

I use Ahrefs for getting the link metrics from the competitors. That's one section in there. And I think that that is useful. But really, the rest of it you could do with just Google and just Google Analytics. You would probably be fine.

 

Chase Clymer

I mean, that's a fantastic offer right there. And I'm sure that Annette is going to make me do this and record myself doing it, eventually for another piece of content for my YouTube channel that isn't... I wouldn't say it's slacking, but I'm not producing seven videos a week I'm producing about one.

 

Annette Grant

Yeah, that's slacking.

 

Chase Clymer

Yeah, I know.

 

Annette Grant

Compared to John. (laughs)

 

John Lock

And if you're doing one video a week, that's a good idea. And I know that people probably want to know, how many videos should I do to see traction? My recommendation, like you just said, is one per week.

 

And if you can consistently do it on the same day each week, if you're doing one a week, that's a good thing to do. Because people... YouTube channels are like TV shows. People anticipate if it's going to drop on a certain day. So being consistent is super, super important.

 

Annette Grant

It's like, why is everything consistency? It's everything. (laughs) It's just what we have to do. We're going to do a link to your SEO audit, correct, in our show notes?

 

John Locke

I hope so. (laughs)

 

Annette Grant

But Chase, do you want to tell them what that is, though.

 

Chase Clymer

Yeah. Oh yeah. So it's John Locke and Lockedown SEO, but there's an 'e' thrown in there. So lock with an 'e' (Locke), lockedownseo.com. His YouTube channel has a bunch of letters that I'm going to screw up, so we're going to link to that in the show notes. But also you're on Twitter as well. What's your Twitter handle?

 

John Locke

My Twitter account is @Lockedown_.

 

Chase Clymer

Awesome. Do you have anything else that you'd like to share with our audience today?

 

John Locke

You guys are doing awesome and put content out there. And you're going to be ahead of 85% of the other stores out there.

 

Annette Grant

I have a question. Last one.

 

John Locke

Yes.

 

Annette Grant

Who do you like on YouTube? Who do you subscribe to?

 

John Locke

I subscribe... I'm like Chase, I subscribe to a bunch of weird channels.

 

Annette Grant

Oh. Okay.

 

Chase Clymer

I watch stuff like Rick Beato music theory. I watch a bunch of review channels where people watch old classic rock and give reactions.

 

Annette Grant

(laughs)

 

John Locke

Things like that. So that's the things that I usually watch on YouTube.

 

Chase Clymer

My roommate is a giant, video game nerd and he would not take offense to that. And somehow my account got mixed in with his because we have all these Roku TVs now, around the house. And half of it is like this vintage, nostalgic video game stuff like the early 90s.

 

And I was like, "Wait, I remember that game." And then I just got... I was down the rabbit hole yesterday and I watched all this stuff about Sega. So other than being good for learning about SEO and Shopify and all the other stuff out there, it's really good for learning about the weirdest stuff on the world.

 

John Locke

(laughs) Yeah, definitely. There's a channel for everything.

 

Annette Grant

Absolutely. Well John, thank you so much. Now Chase and I are going to be chatting about YouTube the whole rest of the day.

 

Chase Clymer

That's exactly what's about to happen. So thank you so much, John.

 

John Locke

Well, thank you for the invite. I appreciate it.

 

Annette Grant

Awesome. Thank you.

 

Chase Clymer

We can't thank our guests enough for coming on the show and sharing the truth. links and more will be available in the show notes. If you found any actionable advice in this podcast that you'd like to apply to your business, please reach out at electriceye.io/connect.

 

Annette Grant

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