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Ep. 111 - Scaling to a $1 Million without Paid Ads and Email Marketing with Vivian Kaye

Vivian Kaye is the Founder & CEO of KinkyCurlyYaki, a premium textured hair extension brand for Black women that she grew to over $1 million in annual revenue. 

As a Business Encouragement Coach, Shopify Expert and proven trailblazer in her industry, Vivian’s community loves her humble approach and how she “keeps it real”. 

Alongside her hosting duties on her IGTV Show, Mind Your Business, Vivian has been featured in The Toronto Star, Ted Talks “The Way We Work”, Shopify’s Expert Academy Series and Privy’s Ecommerce Marketing Handbook. 

Vivian is also a founding Shopify Compass Instructor and has been featured in publications such as The Toronto Star, Black Entreprise, Refinery21 and podcasts such as Shopify’s Vanguard, CBC Metro Morning & The Dean Graziosi Show.

In This Conversation We Discuss: 

  • [00:00] Intro
  • [00:39] Sponsor: Klaviyo klaviyo.com/honest
  • [01:15] Bio shenanigans
  • [02:21] What does Vivian sell
  • [04:57] Vivian’s job before founding KinkyCurlyYaki
  • [05:26] Missing in-person meetup
  • [05:50] Sponsor: Avalara avalara.com/honest
  • [06:40] Executing the idea for a business
  • [08:39] KinkyCurlyYaki’s first website
  • [09:41] Getting the first couple of sales
  • [10:24] Vivian’s crazy founding story
  • [12:14] FB groups and Reddit are still valuable
  • [13:12] Sponsor: Gorgias gorgias.grsm.io/honest
  • [14:02] The realization of success
  • [16:30] Exclusively organic growth
  • [17:43] Sponsor: Rewind rewind.com/honest
  • [18:21] Growing the KinkyCurlyYaki team
  • [20:51] Vivian didn’t start the business to earn money
  • [21:26] Vivian being honest about the current situation
  • [25:26] Vivian educating store owners
  • [28:06] Start small and start now

Resources:

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Transcript:

Vivian Kaye  

Make sure you're solving a problem because the last thing we need are more Ecommerce businesses selling things that nobody needs.

Chase Clymer  

Welcome to Honest Ecommerce, where we're dedicated to cutting through the BS and finding actionable advice for online store owners. 

I'm your host, Chase Clymer. And I believe running an online business does not have to be complicated or a guessing game. 

If you're struggling with scaling your sales, Electric Eye is here to help. To apply to work with us visit electriceye.io/connect to learn more. Now let's get on with the show.

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Chase Clymer  

All right everybody. Welcome back to another episode of Honest Ecommerce. I'm your host, Chase Clymer. And today we're welcoming to the show, an amazing merchant. 

She's going to share her journey of how she grew her business to over $1 million in revenue without paid ads or email marketing. 

Today we're welcoming to the show the founder and CEO of KinkyCurlyYaki, a business empowerment coach, a Shopify Expert, and an all-around dope lady, Vivian Kaye. Welcome to the show.

Vivian Kaye  

(laughs) Thank you so much for having me.

Chase Clymer  

You're welcome. You're welcome. I got excited about that intro beforehand. And... (laughs). 

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah. Yeah. (laughs) Well, if I don't describe myself as an all-around dope lady, who will? Who will?

Chase Clymer  

You know what? Yeah. When someone asks you to just give a bio... I'm just gonna start giving people ridiculous bios and see if they read it.

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah. Do it. I dare you. (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

"International worm farmer." And they're like, "Why is this guy gonna talk about Ecommerce?"

Vivian Kaye  

(laughs) Well, you can sell worms. Everything's a business. So...

Chase Clymer  

I met a guy that sold insects on the internet. It was wild and he was very interesting. I should probably try to look them up and see if he wants me on the podcast, to be honest.

Vivian Kaye  

Absolutely. 

Chase Clymer  

All right. Well you don't sell worms. What do you sell?

Vivian Kaye  

So what I sell are premium, textured, hair extensions for black women.

Chase Clymer  

Okay.

Vivian Kaye

It sort of sounds like "What the heck is that? I don't understand what that means." So when you see black women in popular culture --so we're talking about Oprah or Beyonce, or even Serena Williams-- a lot of black women tend to wear protective styles. 

So those are wigs, those are braids, those are weaves. And only because, 1 our hair can be hard to manage. 

So even if you know any white women with curly hair or even people --period-- with curly hair, you'll notice that they say "Oh man. My hair is so hard to manage. It takes me 23 hours to get my curly hair to dry." Well, even more so as black women. 

Plus our hair is not suited to the North American environment so it tends to get very dry, especially up in the north. Because I'm in Toronto. So when it gets cold, it strips the moisture from our hair. So we tend to wear protective styles. 

However, in the past that tended the hair extensions that we would use had a more European look and feel. So when we switched up our hair, we would go to work at our 9 to 5, Chad and Karen would be asking us, "What are you doing with your hair? What's happening with your hair this week?" 

Whereas I created a product that looks like our hair. So it blended with our hair, and it looked natural, and it looks more authentic on us as opposed to... 

Say Nicki Minaj, for example, who wears 32 inches of blonde weaved down to her back. Some of us don't want to be as... (laughs) Don't want to stand out as much, right?  So...

Chase Clymer  

Yeah.

Vivian Kaye  

...we want to wear hair extensions that look like our hair. But when I went looking for it back in 2012 ,it was buried underneath these silkier textures. And so I thought to myself... And I was running another business at the time. 

So I thought to myself, "Why isn't anyone just selling kinky hair? You know what, I'm just gonna take that idea and file it in the back of my head." Then, because I was trying to solve my own problem, I was wearing the product that I found. 

After a couple of months of research, I found a product that finally suited my needs. And I wore it to a meetup event. And another black woman pulled me aside and asked me who my hairdresser was and what my regimen was for making my hair look the way it did. 

I said "Girl, this is a weave." And that was when the light bulb went off because she's like, "Well, I would buy that." And I thought, "Well, if I bought it and she would buy it, there's got to be at least a dozen other women who would buy it too." 

Chase Clymer  

That's amazing. 

Vivian Kaye  

So that's the beginning of KinkyCurlyYaki. 

Chase Clymer  

What was the business you're running before? 

Vivian Kaye  

I was a wedding decorator.

Chase Clymer  

Oh! 

Vivian Kaye  

Another thing that I started to solve a problem. 

Chase Clymer

Yeah. 

Vivian Kaye

I'm one of those people who see... I see gaps in the market and I'm like "Well, is that a problem that I have? And how can I solve that?" And then I just go after it.

Chase Clymer  

I just got that hustler attitude that that's kind of how I ended up here as an entrepreneur. I'm just always like, "Well, you know what, I'm smart enough to do this." And then people started giving me money. And I was like, "Well, this is fun."

Vivian Kaye  

That's always fun.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. (laughs) 

Vivian Kaye  

(laughs)

Chase Clymer  

Alright. So this light bulb goes off at a meetup which... Just a sidebar there, I can't wait for the world to get in a better place and in-person meetups can come back. 

Vivian Kaye

Oh my gosh! I missed them... 

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. The networking capabilities [during] in-person meetups are just so much fun. We used to do 8 a year in 2 different markets. And now we've been doing them virtual. And while they are impactful, they're just not the same. 

Vivian Kaye

No. It's not the same. It really isn't.

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Chase Clymer  

Alright. Sp the light bulb goes off, what are the next steps? And this might be... Maybe someone is listening now where this is the exact step that they're at. They had the light bulb go off recently. Where did you go with it?

Vivian Kaye  

At first I sat on because I thought... I was already running a business and I thought, "Man, I..." And plus, because I was the customer as well, I knew the demographic very well. I knew the pain points that needed to be solved. 

I knew what the problem was. But I also saw that this could be a very... I don't want to say... It's a very passionate group of people (laughs) who want to wear hair extensions. They're really passionate about it. And I had to really think about it. 

"Do I really want to deal with people who are REALLY passionate about their hair?" And I thought, "You know what, I already dealt with brides." And brides can be some of the...

Chase Clymer  

Most "agreeable" people, right? (laughs)

Vivian Kaye  

Right. Right. So I thought, "Well you know what, if I had success with these brides, I'm going to have success with black women who are really into their hair." So it took me a minute. 

But then one day, I just woke up and just got started. I bought the domain name. I secured all the social media handles. I just got started. And I literally started like... I don't know. You guys can't see me. 

But in my office,-- and I'm pointing to it right now-- there's this Rubbermaid bin, and it's got drawers on it. And that's how I started my business. I started by just buying, I believe, it was just 3 lengths... 

So the hair comes in different lengths. So I had 3 different textures, and 3 different lengths. And I literally bought one of each, took pictures of those, posted them up on the website and said, "I have these available. Here's the price. Order from me, please." 

Because I already knew there were people who were ready to buy, it was just a matter of presenting it in a manner that was different from all the other hair extension brands that were out there. And at the time, there were no companies who were just selling kinky textures.

Chase Clymer  

Was this website... Was it a Shopify site? What did you build out? What was the first iteration of your online store?

Vivian Kaye  

No, the first version was Big Cartel. (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

It's an easy way to get started especially if you're just looking to test the market [or] test the concept. There are really easy solutions that are almost as turnkey as Shopify presents itself as these days. 

Vivian Kaye  

Right. 

Chase Clymer  

There's no wrong way to get started. The right way is to just get started.

Vivian Kaye  

That's absolutely it. You just need to start and make sure that you are talking about the benefits of the product and how it solves the problem for your target consumer. 

But if you're just going out there all guns [blazing] with a product that nobody asks for, you're gonna have a problem with that. But if you just start and just start where you are with what you have, oh man. (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. The hard part's just going zero to one. It's just getting it done and getting out of your own way. You literally are the reason your business isn't as big as it could be. 

Vivian Kaye  

Absolutely. Absolutely. 

Chase Clymer  

Alright. You got a domain. You got this Big Cartel site. You've got some products. And you've got a good idea that this is a product that people want from some kind of impromptu user research.  How'd you get those first couple of  sales?

Vivian Kaye  

Ah, well, because I was part of the target demographic, because I was trying to solve my own problem, I was already in the Facebook groups and on hair forums trying to solve my own problem and looking for solutions. 

And so then I already saw that there was an audience. right And so being Vivian... Vivian means lively one so wherever I go, I just light shit up. Wait... Can I swear? (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

Don't worry. Don't worry. Kurt Elster cussed on the first episode so we're just gonna keep it going.

Vivian Kaye  

(laughs) So everywhere I go, I just light shit up. So when I launched the business... You know what's so funny, people didn't know it was me. 

And so it launched, it was doing really well because at the time, there were no companies just selling kinky textures. And also at the time, there weren't really influencers. There were vloggers or bloggers that you could send products to. 

So I saw girls that were in the forum that were wearing the hair and I sent it to them and said, "Can you tell me what you think?" And then they turned around and created what we now know as "content". 

They created content with it. And it was interesting, because I didn't tell anyone It was me. The product was selling. Everything was going well. But what happened was, I got outed. 

So in these Facebook groups, someone created a fake profile. And they went to the... At the time, I don't know why. I didn't pay for the "who is" my domain name. 

Chase Clymer  

Okay. 

Vivian Kaye  

So all my information was there. And so then they took... They created a fake profile and outed me to these hair groups and said "You know who this company belongs to? It belongs to Vivian. And she was in here spying. And she was in here blah blah blah..." 

And what they meant for evil, what they meant to damage my business actually pushed it forward. 

Because as soon as they found out it was my business, they were like, "You mean Vivian, who's been contributing to these forums and making us laugh and doing all these things? Well, now we're going to support it because now we know who's behind the business."

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. Yeah. I feel like once you... Anyone that's operating a business as a facade, it's almost like you're doing yourself a disservice. People want to do business with other people. 

Vivian Kaye  

Exactly. 

Chase Clymer  

That's the biggest risk Amazon has. It's almost conceived as robotic. If there's a risk to a different business what you can do is do it better i.e. being more personable, and being an actual human being. You're going to succeed in a competitive space. 

Vivian Kaye  

Exactly. Exactly. 

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. So you're, you're moving right along, you are finding initial success in these forums and in these Facebook groups, which is still an amazing way to find your first group of customers.

I have talked to merchants that that's how they got off the ground. This day, in 2020, the year of the pandemic, you can still find customers in these Facebook groups. This isn't an old tactic.

Vivian Kaye  

Oh. Even more so because everybody's online now.

Chase Clymer  

Oh yeah.

Vivian Kaye  

Everybody. 

Chase Clymer  

Facebook groups are built around subcultures which just give themselves to niches. It's just a great way to just get some initial user research out of your product.

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah. Same with Reddit. Reddit's awesome for that, too.

Chase Clymer  

Yes. But don't try to sell anything on Reddit, they will (laughs)

Vivian Kaye 

No. They will crucify you. (laughs)

But it's a way to do research to see, to find groups of people who would be passionate and ready to spend money on your product.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. Reddit, they do like to complain. So it's a great way to find problems that maybe you can help solve with your product. 

Vivian Kaye  

Exactly.

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Chase Clymer  

Let's scoot forward a little bit in time. Where would you say was your first big success? Or like what was an event in the startup phase of the business where you're like, "Wow! This is really catching on. This is really fun. I can't wait to grow this."

Vivian Kaye  

Well, in the first year. In the first year I did just under half a million. Just shy. Like $465,000 in sales. And so when I saw that, I was like, "Wow, like this is me doing it half-assed. (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

Were you still wedding planning at that time?

Vivian Kaye  

I was still. I was still doing wedding decor because I was like, "Yeah. Okay. There's only..." I was just waiting for the bottom to fall because people [are just] buying hair online and we're not... It's not really... At the time, it wasn't really a thing. 

People usually go into beauty supply stores to buy their hair extensions. So at the time, 2013, you're not used to buying hair online like that. But here, I had $400,000 in sales and people... I was like, "Okay! Alright. Well, this could really be a thing." 

But then I got interrupted, because I got pregnant. (laughs) I got pregnant in 2013 and then had my son in 2014. So I had to take a little bit of break but the business was still going. 

And then of course, once the baby came into play, I had my wedding business, I had this Ecommerce business, I had to make a decision. Because I thought, "Well, with weddings I have to go out. 

And if people don't show up, then I have to go show up at 2:00 in the morning with my breasts full of milk (laughs) and all that." 

And I thought, "Well, there's this business that's actually doing really well and I'm half assing it. So what would happen if I put my full ass into it? I could do this at 2 o'clock in the morning. I could do this while breastfeeding, I could really, really do a really good job at this." 

So then I shut down the wedding business and then went full-time with KinkyCurlyYaki in 2015. And then a year after that, I hit my first million.

Chase Clymer  

I think that that's the way that I think is the safe play for most merchants. It usually starts off as a side hustle. And they don't know when they should really go into it. 

And I would say if it's a side hustle and you're impressed by the numbers that you're doing, they will easily double if it's your main focus. 

Vivian Kaye  

Absolutely. 

Chase Clymer  

Maybe even more.

Vivian Kaye  

Absolutely. 

Chase Clymer  

Alright. So you hit that first million. You're cruising along. This is 2015-2016? 

Vivian Kaye  

Mm-hmm.

Chase Clymer  

Alright. You hit the first million. What we talked about when I introduced you is how did you scale to a million without paid ads and without email?

Vivian Kaye  

Well, it was all organic. So it was all the work that I did in these groups --In these Facebook groups and in the forums. And again, I was taking advantage of --at the time-- vloggers. 

Black women were just jumping onto YouTube and doing tutorials on how to take care of your hair, how to wear protective styles. And I took advantage of that. I've always been one of those people or at least I used to be. 

Because I can't deal with the TikToks (laughs) and all that right now. But at the time, I was always ready for  that new thing that everyone was doing. So the new thing was, what's now known as influencer marketing

So I grew the business organically by sending girls hair and just having them... And I didn't even control them. I was just like, "Here's some hair, girl. Create some content." And that's what they would do. 

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. 

Vivian Kaye  

It was a beautiful thing. Beautiful Thing.

Chase Clymer  

I think that's the best way to get started. Just send some sample products and be like, "Do you. If you enjoy it, the content will be more than enough for what I need from you." 

Vivian Kaye  

Exactly. 

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Chase Clymer  

If I didn't tell you to look into TikTok more, I'd be doing you a disservice. It is exploding. And I know some merchants that are finding great success there. And then obviously, this is probably a good time to ask a question now. 

As the business grows and the sales grow... Now obviously, you surpassed a million in sales. You've got a team under you now. When did things start becoming other people's responsibilities? When did that trust... 

No, it probably wasn't trust. It's just more of a necessity. When did you start to grow the team? What was the first hire? How did that look?

Vivian Kaye  

Well, it was actually a bit of both. So it was trust and necessity. So this happened.. I hired my first employee, actually in June of 2016. And it was because I was... Once you start... 

Once I was in the business full time and I saw what activities were actually giving me a return on investment, which was marketing. So getting these girls the hair and getting them to create content. And at the time, the algorithm wasn't so crazy on Instagram so...

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. 

Vivian Kaye  

...everyone would see your post. And so then I focused on that. And so in June of 2016, I hired my first employee. 

And what I had her do was fulfillment because that was the one thing that took a lot of time to do. So I hired her and all she did was fulfill the orders. 

And then my second hire --which was about, I want to say 3, months later--was customer service. Someone where all they did was answer emails. 

And so once I hired those 2 people, of course, when I was able to focus on more money making activities, --that's in December. Actually you know what, I've hit it a few months earlier. 

So I hadn't even realized I hit a million dollars until December. I was a part of Ecommerce Fuel. And they have these flares that you could put beside your username. And I was like, "Well, I...  Let me go check to see how much I make." 

And this time, I'd already flipped over to Shopify. I flipped over to Shopify 2015. And I was like, "Let me go..."I ran my reports, which you couldn't... I couldn't have done it in Big Cartel, which is why I moved over to Shopify. 

I ran the reports and it said I was at a million and... $1.1 million. Something like that. And I was like...

Chase Clymer  

Mm-hmm.

Vivian Kaye  

Whoa... (laughs) When did that happen? (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

That 2 comma club is probably... As an entrepreneur hitting that is usually like... You want to give yourself a pat on the back. And then you're just like, "Well there's... Well, what's the next step from here?"

Vivian Kaye  

Well, the funny thing is I didn't... Because I didn't start the business to make money. I just started to solve my own problem. And then I just happened to make some money. So I wasn't really too focused on the money. I knew I was making money (laughs) right? I knew I could...

Chase Clymer  

Yeah.

Vivian Kaye  

I took some money, I bought a house, I renovated my basement so I could run the business out of my basement. I knew it was doing well. But I didn't know how well.

Chase Clymer  

Well, it's definitely doing well now. So let's fast forward a bit. And now you're running the business. It's been 7 years. 

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah. It's 8 years [in] December. Yeah.

Chase Clymer   

Alright. So what does the business look like these days? What are those profitable, time-consuming activities that you're doing as an owner to push the business forward? 

Everyone always likes to ask "What's working now in marketing?" if they need some ideas and stuff. Obviously, Black Friday/Cyber Monday is next week. 

This won't come out until probably January though. But people will probably be curious of what kinds of sales you might have been running then. 

Anything you want to share about what's happening now?

Vivian Kaye  

What's happening now, Chase, if I have to be absolutely honest, is a hot mess.

Chase Clymer  

Oh yeah?

Vivian Kaye  

It is a hot mess. Well...

Chase Clymer  

Hey, this is Honest Ecommerce. And I love it when people are honest.

Vivian Kaye  

This is it. Because I'm not here to tell you. Oh yeah! Everything's hunky dory." No. The pandemic hurt my supply chain because what I'm selling is human hair extensions. It's human hair. 

So because this is a global pandemic, we got hit with it last November. Except last November, we didn't know what it was, right?

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. There were just issues in the supply chain.

Vivian Kaye  

Exactly. And then lo and behold, February, then we found out what was really happening. And then by the time it hit us here, we'd shut everything down. 

So I want to say that 2020, especially for KinkyCurlyYaki was really the year of just keeping it afloat. And it also gave me the time. Because with growing a business and scaling a business, you're just running after... 

Sometimes when things go well, you're running after it. So you don't really have time to plan. You don't have time to strategize. You're just reacting. 

And so then I've taken 2020 to take a step back and be like, "Okay, so what's not been working in this business? What SKUs can I eliminate? How can I simplify this? How can I bring this back to 2012?" 

Because what I started to find is once I started to grow to push towards 2 million, it started to become something that I didn't enjoy. Because then it became... Well, what happened was a lot of competitors started to enter the space because I was the pioneer. 

I created the niche. So a lot of competitors, which were really the manufacturers of the product over in China, started doing direct-to-consumer too. 

So they were doing things faster and cheaper, and innovating faster than I could. But what they didn't have was my brand story.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. 

Vivian Kaye  

I am the customer. I get high on my own supply.

Chase Clymer  

 (laughs)

Vivian Kaye  

They can't beat me. I can tell you. Even though... You can compare my product to something you found on AliExpress or even Amazon. But I know how the hair is supposed to act because I am the hair. 

That stuff grows out of my head. I know how it's supposed to act. They can't. They have to rely on customer feedback in order to get... In order to grow or earn. Even in order to innovate, right? 

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely. 

Vivian Kaye  

And so then this sort of gave me the opportunity to... And especially with the other pandemic, which is Black Lives Matter. So now it gave me a chance to really focus on the brand story and tell people why I started the business. 

Yeah, you can go and buy the same product on Amazon for $25. But you're actually supporting a real black-owned business.

Chase Clymer  

Mm-hmm. 

Vivian Kaye  

Right? So that's... Honestly that's what I've taken 2020... That's what I've taken the time in 2020 to do. 2021 I want to hit the ground running. I'm introducing some new products. 

I'm going to get on the TikToks. (laughs) And you know what... And I need to bring in younger people to do it because I'm about to turn 43. 

And honestly, I'm looking at TikTok and I'm like "Oh my goodness. I cannot keep up." (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

It's the same strategy as the “vlogging”, as the “Instagram”. It's just recycled. And you know what? 

Vivian Kaye  

Yup. 

Chase Clymer  

I think at this point, it probably should be someone else's job because you need to focus on... I forget where I heard this, but there's that $1,000 an hour activity, and then there's everything else less than it. 

And as an owner, as a founder, as a CEO, however you like to title yourself, you should be focused on that $1,000 an hour activity. And everything else you should systemize and productize and get off your plate.

Vivian Kaye  

Exactly. Exactly. 

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. Well, also this year... Well, I guess this has been happening throughout the growth of the brand. But you've been moving more into education and helping other brand owners too. Would you like to share some more about that?

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah. Well, when the pandemic hit... Of course, because our supply chain got hit, I wanted to feel productive. I wanted to feel like I could make a difference in people's lives, outside of making black women feel good about showing up as they are in the world. 

And I was like, "Well, how can I help people?" I love to teach. And I thought, "Look, there's all these companies now. All these brick and mortars who need to get online really quickly." 

So who best to help them but someone who's actually done it. Who's built a business from zero and knows not only Ecommerce, but just knows entrepreneurship. Period. 

And I love to do it. I'm passionate about it. So that's what I started doing. I started teaching people how to bring their businesses online. One woman I can think of in particular, she had opened up a kid's play space. 

Well, we're not doing that anymore. So what do we do? We helped her... I helped her pivot online. So now she's selling products for kids that spark joy. 

Or even the nail salon that no longer can do... They can do it now, but at the time, they couldn't do nails. So I helped them get online and start selling mani and pedi kits. That's what I spent the bulk of 2020 doing: Helping. 

I can't control the supply chain, but I can control my reaction. And instead of wallowing, chose to help people.

Chase Clymer  

[You] chose to be productive. And that's...

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah.

Chase Clymer  

That's the best way. The world's in a crazy place. And I feel being productive and being busy is a great way to... When you're focusing, all that stuff isn't creeping into your mind as much.

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah. That too. (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

Sometimes it's a welcome distraction. I've read more books this year than I think I've read in my life. So it's been a good year for education, self-education. So are you still doing that? 

Where do people go if they're interested in learning more about... And maybe you help them out with getting online and all that whole entrepreneurship stuff?

Vivian Kaye  

Yeah. You can go to learnwithviv.com. So I just ended Cohort Two of Shopify Prep School. So that's something was... It's a series of live workshops where I walk with you and set up the essentials to getting your Shopify up and running. 

And so, of course, if you want to learn from someone who's actually done it... And I'm not interested in dealing with dropshipping. No, I'm looking for people who are selling tangible products that they're passionate about. 

So yeah. You can go to Learn With Viv. But yeah. That's what I'm currently doing.

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. Well, was there anything that I forgot to ask you about today that you want to share with the audience before we go?

Vivian Kaye  

I just want to remind people, especially if you're just starting out to just start small, right? Don't be afraid to start small. Start where you are. Start with what you have. You don't need to go big or go home or any of that. You just need to start. 

And you just need to start with one product. You don't need a whole suite of products. You don't need to spend millions of dollars. You're not starting a bank, you're starting an Ecommerce biz? So start small. 

Start with that one product. Make sure you're solving a problem. Because the last thing we need are more Ecommerce businesses selling things that nobody needs. Make sure people need it. Make sure you're solving a problem.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah, I always refer to it sometimes when people are starting internet bodegas. It's like, "We don't need that." You know what I mean?

Vivian Kaye  

(laughs)

Chase Clymer  

I need a bodega for the convenience factor. I'm not going to order this weird thing from you when I can go get it down the street.

Vivian Kaye  

Right. Right. Right. So start small. Just start. (laughs) And do it your way. Don't be afraid to be yourself. Because one of the things that I found out in my business is that, like you said. 

People don't buy products, they buy people. So even if you're selling the same thing as something you saw on Amazon, no one can sell it the way you can. 

No one has the same experiences. No one can put the same spin on it. So don't be afraid to put your full ass into it.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. Here's the thing: If there's competition already, then you know there's a market so you know there's people that will buy your product. So... 

Vivian Kaye  

Right.

Chase Clymer  

Focus on that.

Vivian Kaye  

Find the gap. (laughs)

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. Vivian, thank you so much for coming on the show today.

Vivian Kaye  

You are absolutely welcome. Thanks for having me.

Chase Clymer  

I cannot thank our guests enough for coming on the show and sharing their journey and knowledge with us today. We've got a lot to think about and potentially add to our businesses. Links and more information will be available in the show notes as well. 

If anything in this podcast resonated with you and your business, feel free to reach out and learn more at electriceye.io/connect. Also, make sure you subscribe and leave an amazing review. Thank you!