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Ep. 40 - The Keys to E-commerce Scalability and Talking About Agencies with Jason Blumer

Jason Blumer, CPA, has founded multiple companies such as Blumer CPAs, the Thriveal CPA Network and Quoach. Now, he’s a coach, speaker, writer, and growth consultant and has been coaching creative individuals since 2008. He also does podcasts himself! He hosts the Businessology Show and co-hosts the ThriveCast.

On our podcast today, we talk all about agencies and scalability. What are the things you need when handling remote team members? And what are the preparations you need to grow your store?

In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • [1:31] Things to keep in mind when building a remote business for ecommerce
  • [4:02] Tools to manage a remote team
  • [6:03] What are the challenges of new online stores that had initial sales success
  • [7:42] Documenting processes for scalability and added value
  • [8:37] Role clarity
  • [10:22] Chase’s tip for documenting processes
  • [11:07] Capturing information helps with scaling
  • [14:15] Where do product-based companies have problems and how to solve them
  • [15:11] How to grow your business
  • [16:37] Sponsor: https://www.simplr.ai/honest
  • [17:22] The balance between forecast and confidence in sales
  • [18:37] Having a niche market makes sales prediction easier
  • [19:23] Chase’s take on market prediction
  • [20:11] Paid media tips
  • [20:49] Focusing on a good performing single product before scaling
  • [21:44] Chase’s reason for starting and naming the podcast
  • [22:26] Jason’s advice for hiring consulting firms/agencies
  • [23:47] Breaking the growth ceiling
  • [26:11] Caution about incurring debt due to overinvesting
  • [26:37] Owners not taking increases in pay
  • [29:40] Strategic outreach

Resources:

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Transcript:

 

Jason Blumer  

The narrower the market that you serve within, the easier it is to read what they do and what they want. And that just totally depends right on the type of product you're selling.

 

Annette Grant  

Welcome to Honest Ecommerce where we are dedicated to cutting through the BS and finding actionable advice for online store owners.

 

Chase Clymer  

I'm your host, Chase Clymer

 

Annette Grant  

And I'm your host, Annette Grant.

 

Chase Clymer  

And we believe running an online business does not have to be complicated or a guessing game.

 

Annette Grant  

If you're struggling to scale your sales, Electric Eye is here to help. To apply to work with us. visit electriceye.io/connect to learn more.

 

Chase Clymer  

And let's get on with the show.

 

Alright, welcome back to another episode of Honest Ecommerce I am Chase Clymer, your host. 

 

And today, we welcome Jason Blumer, the CEO of 2 creative financial consultancies. They are helping a lot of agencies out there grow their businesses the right way (and) make sure that they're making the right decision. 

 

He's also got a lot of thought leadership coming in, (about) the scaling, hiring... More of the brass tacks of building a business that applies to everyone. Is there anything there that I left out that you think is pretty crucial?

 

Jason Blumer  

No, that's awesome. Thanks, Chase for having me on the show. Yeah, a lot of entrepreneurial boot camp programs, we lead and run and then some, on-site consulting we do with agencies as well. So you got it right.

 

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. So I already have some questions right off the rip. In the pre-show, we were talking a bit about where he was located. And he mentioned something that struck a chord with me as a remote agency owner

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. 

 

Chase Clymer  

And I want to talk about the modern-day business and being able to build a remote business. 

 

What would you think are the things people need to keep in mind if that's the route they want to go with their Ecommerce business or the business that they're building? 

 

What are kind of some of the hurdles or maybe even just mental stuff you need to get over with building an agency or an Ecommerce business in that distributed remote model?

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah, yeah. So we've learned a lot. So our firm's been around since '97 and I've been leading it since 2003. 

 

And there was a time when we were a brick-and-mortar business and then did migrate into a virtual business. We learned a lot. 

 

Basically, a lot of the teams we hire that are remote, we don't meet them and we don't meet our clients, and of course, a lot of Ecommerce business owners certainly don't meet their end-purchasers, I guess. 

 

So, I guess one thing that we've really struggled with and learned a lot is when we bring a team member on is really be clear about the culture they're stepping into, how they need to step into a culture, our core values and support our mission. 

 

And then we stay close to them through the process. So, we make sure we have a pretty solid training program to bring them in and teach them how we do things. 

 

Because we found on remote team members, they can do a few things. They're in their homes so they can become distracted. That's a huge thing. 

 

We have to upfront prep them to not be distracted in their home. And they disappear a lot of times. So they don't show up and we have an online chat system where it's basically our office and they need to be showing up there basically to the office or they're disappearing. And then a lot of times they go off and just do their own thing. 

 

So they become this island unto themselves, they don't feel a part of a bigger firm that we're running. And so we have to constantly pull our team close to each other. 

 

And remote teams, we find that they typically just are always drifting away from the center of the purpose of the firm. And weekly rhythms of team meetings always pull them back in, reminding them that they are part of a bigger thing beyond themselves. 

 

So those have been huge and just managing and continuing to do those things really creates a lot of health and in our culture.

 

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. And I feel like the number one question someone would have that just heard that --you talked about an online chat system--

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

So, what are some of the tools that you have implemented to help manage this remote team? Obviously chat.

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. Some of the basic ones. We're always on Zoom. We're always on Zoom, always showing cameras, requiring cameras. GoToMeeting, we’ll do that sometimes. Yes, some type of online chat system. 

 

Virtual teams really need to move their communication away from email, and they need to move it into a system. An asynchronous system, like a chat system. And asynchronous is... Those are things you got to train a team, right? 

 

If they're in an office, a lot of times you can get immediate answers from people that you need things from. 

 

But virtual is asynchronous, which was really confusing at first. It means you post something, you go work on something, you wait (for) somebody when they have it fit into their schedule and time, they post back to you the answer, and so that's how you live and work in that world. 

 

A lot of people that come into a virtual environment from a brick-and-mortar type office really struggle with that if you don't prep them upfront for the waiting that's inherent built into this asynchronous communication. 

 

So you have to have platforms that do that. And then chat platforms help make it more immediate. So we do text some with our team. 

 

Not often, but for hopping on meetings, or we're running late, we do have the ability to chat quickly through a text or something like that. So those are just... Those communication platforms are really huge in virtual companies. 

 

Chase Clymer  

I can agree. For in-house communication, we use Basecamp. And then for more direct messaging, we use Slack as our instant messaging platform. And then obviously, Zoom is my favorite thing. It's what we're using now. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yep, yeah. Zoom is awesome. Way better than a lot of products out there. Nothing works perfectly like you want it to, but that's okay. These are the best things we have so far. So...

 

Chase Clymer  

Alright, so let's pivot a little bit more into just how you would approach a new client. Let's say that this is a new client. 

 

They're a startup and they've found a little bit of traction now. They're starting to get that traction, they're getting those initial sales. It's a product business or some physical products. It's an Ecommerce brand. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. 

 

Chase Clymer  

And they're starting to onboard their first couple of team members. From your experience, what are probably going to be some of the biggest hurdles to make that growth stage. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

That first part of it to get that going. The mindset shifts, obviously. Shifting from not being able to do everything yourself is part of the first one, but...

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

What are some of these challenges that they're going to get once they do hit that first initial success and then start to grow from there? What are their challenges going to be?

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. There are so many things. There's a lot of things that make businesses really scalable. And when you're smaller, you can do a lot of things on your own. 

 

And so you don't realize, but as an owner, you're running a lot of things out of your head, because you can. So you're following some kind of rote processes in your mind. 

 

You're doing something or you've just trained some kind of operational person, administrative operational person to check orders, push them out, however you do that, people start to run things in their head. 

 

And that's actually not a scalable model. So people get thrown off when they hit a certain level of team members or a certain speed of ordering or some kind of complexity of a team.

 

And they find out that you really have to have those things documented. And so documenting processes early on, even if it's... It's not really granular. 

 

But if you start to really just write down things that you do on a regular basis, you're going to become more of a scalable business. And when you do that, your value increases substantially and your clients just over the top. They'll feel it. 

 

Through the reviews and things that they post to your store or whatever, they're going to feel a lot of value if your responses are quick. 

 

And if you find people that are scaling and moving quickly, and they're responding to customers or the shipping quickly or they're responding to returns and things like that, it's probably because they have documented processes somewhere. 

 

So, documenting processes to pull things out of the head of the owner is one super key to helping you scale. And I'd probably say another one and there are so many. 

 

But another one is really role clarity. It's when you hire somebody, especially early on, you are hiring somebody typically that's doing a lot of different things. The owners do everything. And probably that first few hires, they're going to do everything, too. 

 

And you may even be sitting beside each other doing everything, just speaking out loud. So there's a lot of things you're doing. But team members, as you grow, can become unclear about their role. 

 

Because as you grow, roles become more narrow. That's what roles become in scaling companies. They narrow down. They become deeper in the thing that they do, like quality control or something like that. Or shipping or the technology portion of Ecommerce, these kinds of things start to become more narrow roles. 

 

And people who are in broader roles that have been narrowed over time, you have to clarify that you no longer do these things that's been packaged up into a new role that we needed to scale properly. 

 

And so when we find especially virtual companies that are not super clear, typically with a job title, a job description, and some training around that role, team members just have to make that stuff up themselves. 

 

And so they really start spinning off and doing dumb crap a lot of times. And it really starts to hurt the responses from your customers and things like that. 

 

So those two things. Processes, getting things out of your head and role clarity as you grow. Especially at a certain speed when you really start rolling, you really have to manage those things that allow for scaling. So those are a couple of keys, I think.

 

Chase Clymer  

Oh, absolutely. I can agree so much just from being a small business owner. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

You're talking to myself as a service business and you're talking to our audience as an Ecommerce brand. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

I love it. So I do have one tip. Something that we've gotten pretty good at. Andy, my project manager, would yell at me about this because he likes lists. 

 

But if you don't have time to make a well thought out list, an easy way to get something out of your head --and onto paper per se-- is you can make a live video of yourself doing it. I use Loom so much. 

 

It's one-click on your computer's browser and it will start making a live recording of what you're doing on your screen. 

 

So you can walk through your process right then and there and share it with your assistant, or your designer or your developer to be like "This is what I need (to be) done. Here's exactly how the process would be." It's a pretty efficient way of getting it out there. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah, that's perfect. And we've heard people use Loom. We don't use that. But we do record. And a lot of times when our team is working with our clients, in meetings, I always by definition, I have to record those and then document all notes and processes around that call. 

 

So when I'm on a call with about 5 team members, --we were just yesterday-- and I know that 3 or 4 people are taking notes. And so that's another key to scaling: Capturing information. And people really struggle with that. 

 

And what we find is, when we're consulting with businesses that are scaling quickly, there's a lot of talking that happens. If you're in a room with a team, you talk to them. You talk out loud. And a lot of those conversations just disappear into the ethosphere. 

 

And so a lot of times we find, our clients they'll have... They'll talk through the same conversation multiple times and so we teach them to capture. And capturing is really capturing and documenting. And we even have to teach note-taking. 

 

But what's always happening is we are documenting and pushing into just the tribal knowledge of our company into our chat system in the right rooms and tagging. We're always pushing data in there, instead of speaking all the time. 

 

We're capturing those things. So that's big. And our project manager is in charge of the capture. They're in charge of the process building, the teaching, the training, the capture... And so there's always a way anybody can go find out what we're doing. 

 

So if we hire pretty quickly and the business starts growing fast, that capture always ensures that somebody is going to be able to know what to do. 

 

And even some of these things like role clarity and process-building and capture, what it really benefit she was when you start hiring other leadership. 

 

So if you get to teams of 8 to 10, that typically, those are levels --probably even less than that. 5 to 8-- that's when you're going to find an owner can't really lead that many people on their own. So they start leveraging the help of other team members. 

 

And those are going to be leadership or management positions. And if you've captured and defined processes and you are clear, then the managers can step in and actually know how this company works without you beating it over the head of your team members. 

 

So those are just some benefits. It helps you later when you scale and start hiring people to lead in proxy of your leadership and that's even harder. How to install a leadership team? But those things done earlier, help you lead later.

 

Chase Clymer  

There's a lot of great information there and my mind's spinning. So... (laughs)

 

Jason Blumer  

(laugh) There's a lot of stuff, yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. So, let's pivot a little bit though. Let's get back into the type of businesses that our audience here at Honest Ecommerce runs, startup product businesses. They're selling a physical good online direct-to-consumer. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Mm-hmm.

 

Chase Clymer  

And there was a note here that you made pre-show and you were talking a bit about where some of these product-based companies get in trouble and how do you offset that potential trouble?

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. So I think in any scaling business, typically, you're going to be making an investment. And an investment is... Another word for that is risk. So an investment is always, typically, an upfront expenditure of time or cash in hopes of some future thing happening. 

 

And so that's risky, right? Anytime you're betting on the future, there's a risk. When you hire a new person in a new role, that's a risk because you're hoping that role produces some different level of value that's going to allow you to, I don't know, sell a different level of a package or good or product or something like that. 

 

When you're making investments into the future, you have to really be careful. Now you can't grow and scale without taking risks and investment. So you have to do it. So that is how you grow a business. Making investments and taking risks. But you can do that wrong. 

 

You can really overbuy a product. It can sit too long before you're turning that product. Those kinds of investments eat up a lot of cash. If you're storing that product that's eating up cash. And so the thing about investments is they really take money. 

 

An investment in the future, a risk, you're typically spending some kind of cash. There are a couple of ways to do that. It's to have money somewhere. Either you saved it or you're getting a loan or friends and family loaned you money, you have cash, or your business has revenue that supports the investment. 

 

Which means basically, you're turning so much revenue --and actually profit-- you're turning profits so much that it pays for the investment that you can make it. 

 

So you've got to turn so much cash to pay for that investment. 

 

So, you just have to know, when you're ready to take the risk, what the payoff of the risk is and just to be careful not to bite off too heavy of a risk than you can afford in terms of how much cash you either have in the bank or how much cash and profit your business is kicking off pretty month. That's just a key.

 

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Chase Clymer  

Yeah, I see a lot of Ecommerce businesses getting in trouble here, specifically with buying products. When buying a physical product, it's sitting on the shelf. That's just...

 

Jason Blumer  

Mm-hmm.

 

Chase Clymer  

...it's not cash anymore. It's almost just an investment in yourself. But...

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

...if it's not moving, it's sitting there, you don't have access, that's not liquid. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. 

 

Chase Clymer  

So I know that sometimes creates issues with not doing proper forecasting on what's going to be selling. Also not believing in yourself enough and buying enough of the good when the demand is there. There are two sides to it.

 

Jason Blumer  

Oh yeah. Yeah. So you can invest too high and then you have inventory just sitting there that's not producing cash because... That's the goal. 

 

You want to buy enough products or create enough products so that it's producing and kicking off certain levels of profit for you. But yeah, if you don't believe in yourself enough, then you can't meet demand and then people are unhappy with you. So those are really, really hard things to do. 

 

And I guess, knowing how much inventory to buy upfront, those are the things you... Those are some metrics you really need to stay on top of. 

 

But that's reading a market and that's pretty hard. So what we found is the narrower the market that you serve within, some kind of niche... The narrower the market that you serve within, the easier it is to read what they do and what they want. 

 

And that just totally depends on the type of product you're selling. So I don't know, maybe a lot of product-based businesses want to go a little broader to a broader market, it's just harder to read those markets. 

 

You don't know, "Okay, are they ready to purchase this lifestyle product?" Or whatever. But knowing that market is, I guess, would be key to knowing how to spend your cash on the investment of the product that you think they'll buy. 

 

I don't know Chase, how do you do that? That's (laughs) got to be a hard guess to make about what a market is going to purchase or not? 

 

Chase Clymer  

Oh, absolutely. I think it's easier to market a single product and figure out that product-market fit, in my opinion at least. 

 

But then once you get there, you've got those initial sales. Say you're making another... You've got a breakthrough in a protein bar business or special flavors or it's got some certain edge to it. I think I would scale up the sales of that single product as much as I could...

 

Jason Blumer  

Mm.

 

Chase Clymer  

...figuring out the marketing there. Economies of scale. You buy a lot more of that product. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Nice.

 

Chase Clymer  

And then I would also get a little bit into paid marketing at that point. So now you've got your Google ads and your Facebook ads going...

 

Jason Blumer  

 Ah. I see.

 

Chase Clymer  

...doing those the right way. As an agency owner, I tell everyone out there, when they're buying paid media, you get what you paid for.

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. (laughs)

 

Chase Clymer  

So make sure you understand the risk versus reward, the value that they're going to do for you, and what the processes they're going to have in place for those paid media buys. Because that can get haywire really fast.

 

Jason Blumer  

That paid media is super expensive, so that can be a money hole.

 

Chase Clymer  

Yeah, especially if you don't know what you're looking for, what the outcome of that paid media is.

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah, yeah. So, a targeted market is really key to know it pretty deeply, so you can target that market with that paid media pretty well. But I like what you said. 

 

Yeah, just a single product that you've got some experience and you've got some traction with is a lot better to scale up. 

 

And when you do that and it's you turning off some cash pretty good, then you can start playing around with different products that you just don't know if that same market will also want. Sounds like you go into that slow. 

 

Chase Clymer  

Oh yeah. So say, we're using the same protein bar analogy. It's cooking and it's there. The writing's on the wall and the traction is there. You're like, "This works." Now you want to start playing around with adding another product...

 

Jason Blumer  

Mm-hmm.

 

Chase Clymer  

...I would make sure it's close to that product. So it'd be instead of a protein bar now, we're going to get into protein powder or something else that's in that space. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah, 

 

Chase Clymer  

You can just use common sense, the audience you've already won should like this. And you can test those out.

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. Nice. That makes sense. Yeah, good stuff.

 

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. But you know what, it's easier said than done. That's the scary thing about Ecommerce and building a brand. And that's why I started this podcast and it's why the podcast is named how it is. Honestly, it's hard.

 

Jason Blumer  

It is.

 

Chase Clymer  

And it just takes hard work. There are overnight successes, but you don't hear about how long they worked on it before you heard about it, which is often never overnight. So

 

Jason Blumer  

That's right. Yeah. Yeah. Because you read about somebody being super successful and you're... Yeah, but it takes a lot of hard work to build a successful business that can scale and grow and really provide value to a customer base that wants it over and over. That's a key.

 

Chase Clymer  

Oh absolutely. So during that journey, that scaling journey getting up there, in Ecommerce, it's oftentimes, they're hiring consultancies, they're hiring agencies. And I know that you work closely with agencies and you see them all over the place. 

 

Do you have any advice for our listeners, when they're hiring a consultancy or hiring an agency to help them solve something? 

 

And a more specific question is, when is it the right time for me to hire a consultancy and an agency? Percentage of budget, should I have that to play with? 

 

What are some of those things that I should keep in mind as I'm starting to expand that fractional team to help solve things as I'm growing so fast?

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. Yeah. I think a lot of that... There are not tons of metrics around the percentage of spend on consultants and things like. That's going to be a lot of gut-driven stuff. 

 

But I would say, typically, you need to... You just need the grit to get those first sales and do that on your own for a while. 

 

Those consultants can be pretty expensive, especially the ones that actually have a lot of knowledge that is going to take your business to a new level. 

 

You got to have some cash, you got to have a proof of concept. You got to know (to yourself) "There are products I have that move pretty regularly. And I've been doing this a while." 

 

So you'd want a consultant that's probably going to break a growth ceiling. That's typically... That's always true in scaling businesses, you're going to hit a gross ceiling at some point.

 

And the reason you hit those is because what got you here won't get you there. And that concept, basically means the team you have, the processes, however loose they are, whatever product you have, has gotten you to a certain level. 

 

A lot of people in a scaling business will hit a ceiling where, no matter how hard they work, they'll double down on their work, they'll just market more, they can't seem to break a ceiling. It's typically because there's some new level of knowledge that they don't have about a new level of business. 

 

Because businesses are different at the different size (of) complexities, different size (of) speeds of product turn, different sizes of teams, these are all different models. So one business model with 5 team members and you know 2 products is just not the same as you needing 10 team members where you're you're putting out 30 products. 

 

It's just completely different complex businesses. So they're not the same. And so if you're moving from one to the other, a lot of times you'll hit a gross ceiling and it's because the owner may not have the knowledge to move to one business model. 

 

So a consultant is something... Basically, you're buying back the future with a consultant. You're paying somebody money that knows some things in the future, you're not going to have to go through. 

 

So they teach and train you about some scaling methodologies, that change. You can implement them right now. You probably don't need to spend... You don't need to buy consultants, based upon debt or anything. 

 

Probably your business needs to be able to pay for a consultant. It could be even an accountant, could be a growth consultant, which is what we do for our agency clients. And you need to have the cash to pay for that. But it could be hit or miss. You could purchase money with the wrong consultant. 

 

So, I think you need to vet a consultant pretty hard to find out what kind of proof do they have of being able to do it for other businesses, and what value you're going to be able to get out of that. So I would... Yeah, I would say be careful. 

 

There's not a certain level of spend but you want to save up some cash probably, and spend that consulting money from something your business can already pay for. Don't do it with debt or something like that, I would say.

 

Chase Clymer  

I think that's fantastic advice. I also think that going into debt over paid advertising is also extremely risky. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Definitely.

 

Chase Clymer  

I would say you should be able to afford that with profit. Or at least...

 

Jason Blumer  

Yup.

 

Chase Clymer  

....run into the numbers, and (see) what makes sense. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah, for sure. Yeah, I agree. And I guess that that means you got to be at a certain level of... You already know your market-product fit at that point... And another way to invest is that owners don't take increases in pay. And that's normal too. 

 

So, people keep a tight budget for 3 or 4 years, personally. So that they don't take a lot of money out of the business. They don't buy a bunch of toys and things like that. Nice cars. 

 

They actually stay pretty lean and they invest that cashback in new people, some new roles, playing around with some paid marketing, using that cash for some of those things, playing around with multiple products, starting to test those. 

 

You just gotta make sure you have a business that is turning some level of cash before you start really taking those risks.

 

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely. I can't agree more there. Especially just... That's the hard truth. You can't expect someone else to make your business profitable if you can't make your business profitable. Because there's probably an underlying issue. 

 

Jason Blumer  

That's right. 

 

Chase Clymer  

Which is...

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah, 

 

Chase Clymer  

Product-market fit... 

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah. 

 

Chase Clymer  

...you can't sell... You can't sell snow to an Eskimo.

 

Jason Blumer  

That's right. (laughs) Right. So you have to know something. You have to have some level of ability to sell a product  before you start spending money on scaling. 

 

Scaling happens after you figured out something. I mean, you got to figure out some of it on your own and that just takes a lot of hard work. And a lot of hours sometimes.

 

Chase Clymer  

Oh absolutely. It is a lot of hard work and it's but it's fun. If I wouldn't still be doing this, the entrepreneur side of me, I've been doing it for way too long now. This would be... If I thought about it, this would be my 4th or 5th business. So it's very... Once you...

 

Jason Blumer  

Yeah.

 

Chase Clymer  

Once you like working for yourself and the joy that comes out of figuring it out, i's a lot of fun.

 

Jason Blumer  

That's right. There's no going back. After (you've become) your own boss, huh?

 

Chase Clymer  

No, not at all. Awesome. Well, you shared a lot of amazing things with our audience today. Is there anything that you want to --you think-- that they would like to know before we go here?

 

Jason Blumer  

No. If they want to follow us, we put out a lot of just quick, strategic videos online people can watch. Just Word of the Day is what we call them. 

 

Word of the Day, where we'll pick a word and we'll talk about just what that word means in the strategy of building a business and they can find it at BlumerCPAs.com. That's our site. Go to the blog and just watch some videos of things we put out. So I hope that helps everybody. 

 

Chase Clymer 

I think we should also plug the original reason why we met, which was your podcast.

 

Oh, that's right. Yeah. So The Businessology Show. Yeah, so that's it. That's Businessology.biz. It's where you'll find our podcasts. We've been around for about 6 years. And yeah, we interview agency owners on growth, too. It's like yours, Chase. 

 

It's a chat show where we just talked about the ups and downs of growth. And what's cool Chase is you get to be on our show soon. So we'll be promoting and sharing our shows with each other.

 

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. And so this just goes to talk about how... Strategic outreach. You can make friends out there in the world, and you can help each other out. 

 

Jason Blumer  

That's right. Yeah. So I hope we can help some of your listeners run their businesses better and then you'll be able to help our listeners run their business better. 

 

And we're just sharing information and it helps us all run our businesses better. So it's really cool. Thanks for having me on the show, man.

 

Chase Clymer  

Alright. No worries. Thank you for coming. 

 

Jason Blumer  

Sure. 

 

Chase Clymer  

We can't thank our guests enough for coming on the show and sharing the truth. links and more will be available in the show notes. If you found any actionable advice in this podcast that you'd like to apply to your business, please reach out at electriceye.io/connect.

 

Annette Grant  

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