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Ep. 90 - There Are No Shortcuts on the Road to Success with Sarah Moret

Sarah Moret is the founder and CEO of Curie. Like most good ideas, Curie was born out of a personal need, as Sarah struggled to find personal care products that were both safe AND effective. 

When she realized this was a struggle for others as well, she bootstrapped the brand on $12k of personal savings, and within 6 months managed to hit 6-figure revenues with zero marketing budget. The brand has since grown from 1 to 4 SKUs and is sold in stores nationwide. 

Prior to founding Curie, Sarah worked in Venture Capital for almost 5 years investing in seed stage startups in the Bay Area and LA. 

In This Conversation We Discuss:

  • [00:00] Intro
  • [01:26] From VC to Startup
  • [06:35] How long Sarah developed the product
  • [09:10] Founders draw inspiration from personal needs
  • [09:58] Sponsor: Postscript: postscript.io/install
  • [10:29] Transitioning from employment to Ecom
  • [12:25] Go all-in or you’ll regret it
  • [13:57] Determining product-market fit
  • [16:32] Sponsor:  Klaviyo klaviyo.com
  • [17:02] Being data-driven
  • [17:45] Convertible notes, funding, and financing
  • [19:21] Paying for funding debt
  • [21:05] Sponsor: Gorgias gorgias.link/honest
  • [21:52] Curie’s initial marketing strategy
  • [25:51] Having an audience before doing paid media
  • [27:37] Disadvantages to paid marketing
  • [30:03] Keep your organic channels strong
  • [30:49] Curie’s owned marketing strategies
  • [35:43] Check out Curie and Sarah!

Resources:

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 Transcript:

Sarah Moret  

(When) building the brand, it has to be something that you're personally like intrinsically motivated to create.

Chase Clymer  

Welcome to Honest Ecommerce, where we're dedicated to cutting through the BS and finding actionable advice for online store owners. 

I'm your host Chase Clymer, and I believe running an online business does not have to be complicated or a guessing game. 

If you're struggling with scaling your sales, Electric Eye is here to help. To apply to work with us visit electriceye.io/connect to learn more. Now let's get on with the show.

All right, everybody. Welcome back to another episode of Honest ecommerce. I'm your host, Chase Clymer. And today, we welcome another amazing brand founder to the show. I know that the crowd... Well I guess you don't have crowds with a podcast. Audience, I guess. 

The audience really enjoys when I speak with brand founders. They find it very, very impactful and insightful. So without further ado, I'd like to welcome to the show Sarah Moret from Curie. How are you doing today?

Sarah Moret  

I'm doing well. How are you doing?

Chase Clymer  

I am doing fantastic. Apparently, it is hot where we're both from. So you know, we're dealing with that.

Sarah Moret  

(laughs) Just cranked up the AC. 

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely. Cool. So I guess, let's just dive in with these episodes. It's really fun to just start at the beginning. So, before you launch the brand, you were in venture capital, I do believe. 

Sarah Moret  

Mm hmm. 

Chase Clymer  

All right. So what's the journey like from venture capital to starting your own brand?

Sarah Moret  

Well... So I spent about 5 years in venture capital before I started my brand. Before that, I actually was a CPA and worked at a Big 4 Accounting Firm. I realized very quickly that that is not the right career path for someone that doesn't really like to follow rules. 

And that is precisely what accounting is. And so I quickly learned that that was not the right career for me. I was really looking for something with more creativity and ability to talk with people. 

I'm an extrovert. I'm a social butterfly. Let's be real. So I left. I left my career in accounting, moved to San Francisco, and joined a seed stage venture capital fund. I was there for about 2 years, started on the finance side, and hustled my way onto the investing team.

So I was doing finance and accounting and more back office work, started just showing up at pitch meetings and ended up finding my way onto the investment side. 

And so I worked there and then another fund down in LA, where I was focused more on direct-to-consumer, mostly direct-to-consumer technology, like apps, marketplaces, stuff like that. But this was 2016-2017. 

It was when really direct-to-consumer brands were starting to become venture-backed like it was becoming more normal. And we were seeing some venture returns and in brand direct-to-consumer brands. 

And so we started to look at a couple companies and I got really, really interested in the ability to grow and scale a brand using technology and how low the barriers had become. So with Shopify, like with Stripe, all the barriers that initially existed in building a scalable drop to consumer brand, all of a sudden came down. 

And you could really bootstrap. We were seeing companies that were bootstrapped and growing hundred million dollar brands within 3 to 5 years. And that just wasn't possible before. 

And so I started to become fascinated with clean beauty and there was this... Especially in LA, we had Moon Juice open up around the corner from my office, Beautycounter started while I was in venture, we looked at them, goop was starting to become more mainstream and created their marketplace. 

And I just saw this happen all before my eyes and I just became obsessed with swapping out all my products for healthier versions. I started flipping all my products over and actually paying attention to the ingredient list and was really, really shocked by how little regulatory oversight there is on skincare products especially. 

And so I started to swap all my products and become really interested in this space. And during that process, I personally was trying to find an aluminum-free deodorant. I had read about the harmful effects of aluminum and parabens, and all the chemicals that are in your drugstore antiperspirants. 

And that is the one product I could not find that actually worked. I kept trying every brand under the sun. They --within like an hour-- I would have been better off just not wearing anything. I smelled terrible. (laughs) And so that's really how the idea for Curie was born. 

It was partially coming from that venture background and seeing how brands were building and scaling and using off-the-shelf technology. And then at the same time, it was just a personal need. 

I couldn't find a good natural deodorant, I felt like there was a gap in the market. And I also felt like there was... Overall there is stigma that natural products just didn't work as well. That was really a customer sentiment. [It] was that you were sacrificing something by switching to natural products. 

And so that really was the idea behind Curie. It's to prove that wrong. Prove that stigma wrong, create really effective personal care products that are awesome with clean ingredients so that they're safe for you. But first and foremost, they have to work. 

People aren't going to continue to buy the products if they don't work. So I started to work with a chemist down in LA, our first product was the deodorant. It took 9 months to develop. 

But once I put it on the market, I created the website myself with Shopify, and really bootstrapped it with my own savings and saw some early traction that made me decide to take the leap and grow the brand.

Chase Clymer

That's amazing. So I do have a question for you. How long were you searching for the solution on your own for this product? How long were you searching for it until it dawned on you that you might have to tackle this yourself and like this might be your next project.

Sarah Moret  

I don't remember how long but it felt like a long time. Let's just say I tried everything. And my friends and family were like "Shut up about natural deodorant. Why are you so obsessed?" (laughs). 

I was asking everyone. I was doing Twitter polls, I was asking people on Instagram, who actually has a natural deodorant that works because none of them work. 

And I would say it was probably a 6-month journey of trying things out and trying to make my own doing research on ingredients and finally decided, "Hey, why not just try it out? Let's see if we can make one that's better." And so in my typical CPA fashion, I created a spreadsheet of every potential ingredient that was an odor absorber or odor neutralizer and created a whole spreadsheet of ingredients and tested every product. 

I did a whole matrix of what worked, what didn't work, and then brought that to our lab that we ended up using for the first formula. 

I was like, "Hey, I have an idea of what I want to put in it. And you guys helped me make it, make it smooth, make it effective, make it..." All the important qualities... And it took a while. 

I think we iterated on the first formula probably over 20 times. So in my... I think a lot of first time founders or especially in personal care are a little naive and I definitely was. I went into it being like, "We'll have a product in 3 months." 

But that typically does not happen especially for a product like natural deodorant is really challenging. And so it took much longer than I thought it would. But hey, I still had a day job. And I didn't have any investors that were pushing me. 

So it was really.... It turned out to be an advantage that I started the company as a side hustle because it let me take my time and make sure that we got the formula right.

Chase Clymer 

It's wild to me how similar your story is to Marnie’s story from Thigh Society. I don't know if you're familiar with her products. But she --almost to a tee-- was saying she was walking around just "annoying" people asking them about these types of products that she was...That she would soon come to offer. So it's funny, it's...

Sarah Moret  

That's how it happens. I think for a lot of people, it starts out as an obsession, especially [for] a lot of bootstrapped founders. 

Because to take that leap and put your own savings into building the brand, it has to be something that you're personally, intrinsically motivated to create. And I think for a lot of people that comes out of a personal need. 

Chase Clymer  

Awesome.

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Chase Clymer  

So let's... I got a few questions about... Fast forwarding [a bit], you've been doing this for a while. How long were you working on the brand? How long -- after launch-- Did it take you to feel comfortable with transitioning out of having a full-time job and just diving all-in?

Sarah Moret  

Yeah, that's a good question. And it definitely took me longer than I think I should have taken. So I spent... Actually, the first year... So we launched in April of 2018 or... No, May of 2018. And I spent the entire first year and still with a full-time job. 

And I think what I realized... And actually, what really I had been thinking already we were doing pretty well. We were growing month over month. We didn't have any marketing spend. It was all organic growth. 

And we were seeing double-digit percentage growth month over month and it was all just word-of-mouth. Influencers would post about it. A couple celebrities got their hands on it. We got coverage in Glamour, despite not having a PR team or anything formal. 

And so it was that I was seeing a lot of product-market-fit and all the stuff that you would look for in a venture when evaluating companies. 

But the idea of leaving my full-time job was just really scarier than I had anticipated. So it took me longer and took me longer. I wish that I had gone all-in earlier. But I listened to... Have you listened to Phil Knight’s book Shoe Dog?

Chase Clymer  

It's on my to do list. I have a pile of books. I actually like reading books. I can't listen to books. I will fall asleep. I don't know why. 

Sarah Moret  

(laughs)

Chase Clymer  

So I have a pile of physical books and it's in there. I've got so many.

Sarah Moret  

Yeah. So I listened to that. But the audio... Audible of that book around like the 9-month mark of the business, we were seeing a lot of growth, seeing a lot of traction. I was still at my full-time job. 

And I was listening to that book. And he said... And I wish I had the exact quote, but he said in the book that when he started Nike, he's like "I went all-in. and I knew that if I didn't go all-in on this idea [and] on this business and it failed, I would always wonder what  if. 

Versus if I just put one foot in one foot out. And if I put... If I go all in and it fails, I'll always regret not going all in." Whatever... I can't remember the quote, but... 

Chase Clymer  

I think we know you're saying. You gotta you got to make the dive

Sarah Moret  

(laughs) He said, "You got to go all in. If you don't, you're always going to regret that." And so I left my job. Shortly after that, I did end up raising a convertible note and [we're] off to the races. We hired a team, we did a rebrand and we've now since then launched 2 additional products which is our spray deodorant and our hand sanitizer.

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. So I got a question for you because I always talk about this in the podcast. Other than brand founders like yourself, I'm always talking to subject matter experts  in the ecosystem.

Sarah Moret  

Mm-hmm.

Chase Clymer  

And something we always talk about is how it's hard to help brands before they get that product-market fit. And with your background in venture, what were some of the indicating factors you are looking for in these brands where you like it seems like they have product-market fit. 

So what are things that young entrepreneurs should be looking for within their upstart product businesses where they might be onto something.

Sarah Moret  

So I'll tell you.... Because it really varies company... Depending on the company. 

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely.

Sarah Moret  

For us, when I started Curie part of the attractive thing about the business model is that with deodorant, and with hand sanitizer, and with the products that we're selling, they're typically repeat purchase products. 

If you find a deodorant that you really love, you're gonna keep buying it. Prior to starting Curie prior to starting this natural deodorant journey, I used the same brand for like 10 years. And so it really depends on the business and the different metrics that you look at. 

But for a business like mine, where if you like the product, you're going to continue buying it every 2 to 3 months. And my biggest metric --that I was paying attention to-- was repeat purchase rate. 

So I was looking for... Okay if we see a repeat... The number that I had in my head was... We want to keep our repeat purchase rate above 30%. That's pretty high for the industry, but I felt like [that] was a reasonable metric for us, given how the nature of the product and that it should be a repeatable purchase if you like it.

So once we went... I think it was... Really quickly, we exceeded that threshold. And then another important metric for us is conversion rate. If you're in... You know this. Being in digital marketing, driving customers to your website is great, but if they're not purchasing on the website, it's useless.

And so we pay really close attention to our conversion rate. We've had a really, really high conversion rate since starting. I think our average last quarter was 3%. So if we can maintain that level of conversion rate and maintain that level of repeat purchase rate, it makes it really easy to get that flywheel going. And when we do start with doing... 

Putting some major spend behind digital marketing, we can have some predictability in what that's gonna look like in growing the business.

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely.

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Chase Clymer  

So with your business, coming from your accounting background, I'm assuming that you guys are all about the numbers over there.

Sarah Moret  

Yes, I'm all about the numbers. And our whole team is... We're pretty data driven. Our CMO who joined in October of last year. She came from Uber where she did... She ran marketing for years.and they're really a data-driven organization as well. So we really try to look at... Make every decision based on the numbers rather than just relying on gut or anything else.

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely. So you mentioned something as part of the growth of the business is that you guys had a convertible note. So for those that aren't familiar with that or don't know what that kind of opportunity is, I guess you could just shed a little light on that.

Sarah Moret  

Yeah. So there are different options when you're raising outside financing for the first time. And what you typically see is either a priced round, or a note of some sort. A convertible note. You'll ]sometimes hear] about safe notes, kiss notes, there's all different types of convertible notes. They're all essentially debt. 

So when you're raising your first round of outside capital, what we would typically recommend... When I worked in venture capital and what we would see most founders doing is if you're raising, let's say, less than a million dollars, typically it's easier, it's quicker, it's cheaper to just do some type of convertible debt like a convertible note, a safe, or a kiss. 

And that is quick and easy. You don't even really... I do recommend it if it's your first time raising financing to use a lawyer, but it's going to be way lower in fees than if you did a priced round. So a priced round is if you're raising.... 

I would say over a million dollar is when it becomes worthwhile to actually do a full-on priced round. That's when you hear series seed, series A, series B, that is when you are selling equity in the company, rather than just taking on a convertible note.

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely. And then with raising that debt, how is that paid off or how does that turn into like an investor or a board member? I'm assuming that everything's unique in these situations, but what's the general consensus of those?

Sarah Moret  

It's all really dependent on the founders and the investors. But let's say you raise a $500,000 convertible note. Typically, a convertible note and a safe are structured in a way that it will convert. That's why it's called convertible. 

And it will convert in the next round of financing. Or if you don't raise another round of financing, you get acquired before you raise the next round, then it converts into preferred stock for that. So either it's going to convert... There are 2 triggers: One of them is the next round of financing. 

So, if you raise a $500,000 convertible note, and then in 18 months, you raise a Series A  priced round, that convertible note automatically converts into stock in that next round at an agreed upon price that's usually at a discount to that round. 

And then alternatively, if the company gets acquired in 12 months, then that convertible note converts automatically to stock and then the investor gets basically paid on stock in that way.

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. I really need to get more into figuring that out.

Sarah Moret  

It's basically a really easy way to raise financing without having... It's kicking the can down the road of having to agree on valuation and do all the legal paperwork required to do a price round.

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely.

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Chase Clymer  

So, you're just over 2 years old officially, I would say. What were some of the... You mentioned a little bit before with your first growth tactics, a lot of word-of-mouth influencers, celebrity... 

Where were you focusing your time and energy on marketing the path you established the product? What were you doing to really drive that first initial traffic and exposure to the brand?

Sarah Moret  

I wish I could say that it was extremely planned like that.

Chase Clymer  

Oh yeah. (laughs)

Sarah Moret  

(laughs) It wasn't. And we... I'll tell you what I did. 

So when I launched the company in 2018, the first thing I did was I reached out to all my friends, family network, everybody I knew, and I said "Hey, guys, I'm launching this company. And we have a natural deodorant we're launching next week. Please email me your address if you want to try it. And if you try it and you like it. Please post on social media and tell all your friends." 

And so I think we ended up sending like 200 packages out to friends and family, and people were so supportive and posting about us. And that, I think, drove our first.... It's a $12 product. I think our first month on the market we had $5,000 in sales. 

And I think most of that was friends and family posting about it. I think the beautiful thing about the product and being... Starting with the natural deodorant is... That problem was not unique to me. 

A lot of people like most people that I would talk to were like, "Oh, yeah, natural deodorant doesn't work." 

And so it was a great product to get that viral word of mouth because when people tried it, and they liked it, they would post about it, and they would tell their friends about it, and people would send me screenshots. They still do, but this was really exciting.

 In the early days, people would send me screenshots of group chats with their friends where they were like, "Oh, you guys natural deodorant doesn't work. Does anyone know when that works?" 

And someone would pipe in like "Try Curie!" and everyone would be like, "Oh my gosh." And people were ordering it like in bulk for their office. In the early days, that was really exciting. 

Someone from Salesforce bought, I think, 4 dozen sticks and gave them all out to all their co-workers because they were all talking about how natural deodorant didn't work. And it was a lot of just feeding that word-of-mouth and encouraging it. 

We set up a referral program within a month because we're just seeing so much referral traffic. We figured, "Let's incentivize people." And then we did a lot of influencer gifting. 

Again, it was a product that people were talking about. And so it was pretty easy to find influencers that had been... We will just search for keywords on Twitter or look on Instagram at what influencers are posting about, and we would reach out, offer to send them a stick for free, no strings attached. If you like it, great. If not, no worries. 

And we saw a really good hit rate on people posting. And like I said, we had some like pretty big influencers and celebrities post about it for free, just because they were so excited about finding something that worked. 

And so that was basically the strategy at the beginning. [It] was just trying to find a way to get in front of as many eyeballs as we could and most of it was through social media.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. And not only that, you were putting your money where your mouth was. You were sending free products and there's obviously an investment in that. [It's] showing how much that you believed in it, just to get it...

Sarah Moret  

Mm-hmm.

Chase Clymer  

...get it out there and try to get the word of mouth out. So let's fast forward now to... Now obviously, you're a bit more mature of a company. What does the marketing stack look like now? Where are you guys spending your time? Maybe we're talking about channels that you guys spend time in or whatnot. I'll just hand it off over to you.

Sarah Moret  

Yes. So we actually only recently started doing paid marketing and so like I mentioned we brought on a...

Chase Clymer  

I want to stop you there.

Sarah Moret  

(laughs) 

Chase Clymer  

Yes! Because (laughs) there are so many people that are like " We're gonna get this product live and we're gonna do Facebook ads and we're gonna win." 

It's so relieving to hear [that] you guys took your time before getting into paid (marketing) and you really established your core audience, your avatar perhaps and found ways --more cheap ways-- to grow the business because paid (marketing) is expensive.

Sarah Moret  

Exactly. Paid (marketing) is expensive and what I found was... And I think I got this advice early on from an advisor or something: that it's a lot easier to run paid ads profitably when you already have traffic because then you get that blend of a little bit of top of funnel which typically is more expensive... 

Chase Clymer  

Mm-hmm.

Sarah Moret  

...and retargeting. So we already... By the time we started running paid ads, we already had a significant following and we had good traffic on the site. 

And so it was easier for us to have a better customer acquisition cost through paid channels once they were already established. I don't know if you've seen that with others...

Chase Clymer  

Oh. The hardest thing to do is to profitably do prospecting. If you can turn a profit on prospecting [as] a younger brand, you're working magic, it's very difficult. 

Sarah Moret  

Yeah. 

Chase Clymer  

And it takes a lot of time and energy to figure it out. And that translates to an investment and not only a skilled team. 

Also, you're burning dollars to try to figure out what will work in prospecting audiences. Because you're not working with the data set to cheat your way to audiences that makes sense. like with existing data. 

Sarah Moret  

Exactly.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. And then there's the other thing with that is if you're putting all your eggs in one basket for growth --I.e. like Instagram and Facebook ads-- they change the algorithm or your product category gets banned, [then] your entire business is bankrupt.

Sarah Moret  

Exactly. Yeah. And so... And another thing that  we wanted to wait for was getting our AOV up. So we launched with 1 product, --1 SKU, 1 scent-- which was our White Tea Natural Deodorant, and it was $12. 

And so for the first year of the business --first almost year and a half of the business-- our average order value was maybe $16. 

We had some discounting if you would order multiple, but it was below $20 because we had a low price point product, which as you know, that makes it challenging to profitably acquire customers through digital channels. 

And so we worked hard over the last year. Basically, I was like "Let's get our average average order value up before we start running paid ads or else we're just going to be losing money." And so we've successfully grown our average order value. 

And I would say we've almost tripled it. And by introducing bundling of products, we've [sold] tons of our bundles of... 

We offer a hand sanitizer, a stick deodorant and a spray deodorant and a cute little case. We have now several SKUs, different sizes, different scents. And so that combined with having an existing audience and having that existing traffic, we decided it's time to start running ads. 

So at the moment, we're doing Facebook, Instagram, Google, Amazon and we're seeing a lot of success there, right now. It's definitely up and down. 

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. 

Sarah Moret  

And as I'm sure you know. With COVID and everything that's going on right now it's definitely... There's some volatility there. So we're making sure that we keep our organic traffic and our organic growth high. 

I'm still fostering that word-of-mouth growth. So fostering our referral program, still doing lots of gifting. We do... 

We have a great group of micro-ambassadors, micro-influencers that are ambassadors, and then we also are bringing on customers as ambassadors as well. And that's continuing to help us grow and offset some of that volatility that we see daily on digital channels.

Chase Clymer  

Awesome. And then what about on the email side of things or just more owned marketing? It's what the turn of phrase a bit has been a lot lately. How are you guys dealing with that?

Sarah Moret  

Yeah. We have a pretty robust email list and I think email is our best channel. And so email does... We do really well in email marketing campaigns. We use Klaviyo. And they're great. 

And we also started to ramp up on content and blog content, specifically. And really SEO-driven blog content. I think there's a lot of curiosity and interest that people have around natural products.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. You've got a product that people are searching for. Those terms are...

Sarah Moret  

Exactly. So people are searching, people want answers, people hear. "Oh, is there really a natural deodorant transition period?" 

Or with hand sanitizer. We have... Our hand sanitizer is really unique. We put hyaluronic acid in it. And that's something. So hyaluronic acid is super moist... It's a humectant and it basically...

Chase Clymer  

You guys can't see the weird face I made. (laughs)

Sarah Moret  

(laughs) I swear. It sounds scary, but if you're into skincare, hyaluronic acid is basically the best skincare serum that you can use. It's in every high-end skincare serum and lotion. 

And so we put it in hand sanitizer. Something that hadn't been done before. And it makes our hand sanitizer super silky and really hydrating. 

And so that in itself is [the reason for] writing blog content about what are our ingredients, what do they do, why are we using them, where are they sourced from? 

These are all questions that people are googling and they're asking. And so it was... It was slow... I would say the advice that I give [to] other founders about growing a blog is it takes time.

You don't see an impact for months. And we've, over those months, stopped and started and stopped and started. And we've been like, "Oh, this isn't actually doing anything. Let's take a break." 

And then all of a sudden, 4 months later, our traffic from 4 of our blog posts is driving like 30% of the traffic for one month.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah, content is such a slow play. But honestly, it's probably the hardest system to build within your business. And it's just like... Just get it out of the way. Get started on building it.

Sarah Moret  

Yeah.

Chase Clymer  

 And the best thing about it is you can start slow and ramp it up.

Sarah Moret  

Yeah. Our CMO ran the blog at Uber. And so I'm really grateful for her because she... I was the one that was like, "We're not seeing much of an impact from this. Are you sure this is worth it?" And now I'm like, "We need more blog content!"

Chase Clymer  

(laughs)

Sarah Moret  

"This is amazing!" And she... Along the way she's like "It's gonna take time. SEO takes time." And she was right. So that's the important word of advice I would give anyone that's considering investing in content. 

You have to be consistent, and you have to just wait. It's a waiting game and then one day you're gonna see an impact. 

Chase Clymer  

I've been doing this so long now. You're nearing Episode 100. I don't know what the actual number is, but it's so funny now. I asked these questions. 

Sarah Moret  

You're a pro.

Chase Clymer  

I already know the answers before you say it. I just asked so much leading... I ask these leading questions, because there are so many similarities in growing a brand.

Obviously, the products are different and the marketing tactics might be different, but like the ones that work [have] always the same answer. You're investing time in AOV, in your conversion rate upfront to make sure that things are working. Then you move into paid. Email is a giant part of the brand...

Sarah Moret  

That's the thing. There's just... There's no trick. And there's no quick... And everyone's looking --always looking-- for like that quick fix or that quick trick or hack. And I've learned that there is no such thing. 

If you want a brand that's gonna continue to grow and be long lasting you know success, it's daily work that you have to put into it. And it's sometimes frustrating because you don't see overnight success. 

But if you just keep chipping away at it, keep writing those blog posts, keep tweaking your creative, and copy on your ads, keep launching new products,eventually you'll see you'll see the fruits of your labor. It's just sometimes not instant.

Chase Clymer  

Yeah. It boils down to effort and equals results out like it's just a simple formula there. Sarah, you've been an amazing guest. Is there anything that I didn't ask you today or just anything that you'd like to share with the audience before we go?

Sarah Moret  

[The] only thing I would like to share is check out our products in curiebod.com. We have the hand sanitizer which is our newest product. 

And we have the stick and the spray deodorant. The spray deodorant is my personal favorite and I think that is our game-changing product. 

Most people still use stick deodorant and after switching to spray, I'm like, :I will never go back." It's amazing. So check out our products. Check out our site, follow us on social media @curiebod and I'm pretty active on Twitter. I think that's how we connected. 

Chase Clymer  

Absolutely. 

Sarah Moret  

So my Twitter handle is @thats_a_moret with underscores between the words.

Chase Clymer 

Awesome. We'll make sure to link to all that in the show notes. Thank you so much for coming on.

Sarah Moret  

Yeah, thanks for having me.

Chase Clymer  

I cannot thank our guests enough for coming on the show and sharing their journey and knowledge with us today. We've got a lot to think about and potentially add to our businesses. Links and more information will be available in the show notes as well. 

If anything in this podcast resonated with you and your business, feel free to reach out and learn more at electriceye.io/connect. Also, make sure you subscribe and leave an amazing review. Thank you!